Cynical - definition, pronunciation, transcription

Amer.  |ˈsɪnɪkl|  American pronunciation of the word cynical
Brit.  |ˈsɪnɪk(ə)l|  British pronunciation of the word cynical

adjective

- believing the worst of human nature and motives; having a sneering disbelief in e.g. selflessness of others (syn: misanthropic, misanthropical)

Examples

Cynical people say there is no such thing as true love.

People are so cynical nowadays.

She's become more cynical in her old age.

Some people regard the governor's visit to the hospital as a cynical attempt to win votes.

Since her divorce she's become very cynical about men.

Analysts remain cynical about whether these deals will pay off.

He gave a cynical laugh at the blush which deepened the colour in her cheeks.

The public is cynical about election promises.

a cynical view of human nature

a cynical disregard for international agreements

... was quiet spoken, but he had a cynical arch to his brows, as though he were repressing an urge to sneer.

a cynical and amoral way of competing for business

Tonight,Tim Goodman casts a cynical eye on TV ads.

He smiled, a slow cynical twist of his lips.

...a movie about a cornball making his way through a world of cynical sophisticates...

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