Frame - definition, pronunciation, transcription

Amer.  |freɪm|  American pronunciation of the word frame
Brit.  |freɪm|  British pronunciation of the word frame

noun

- the framework for a pair of eyeglasses
- a single one of a series of still transparent pictures forming a cinema, television or video film
- alternative names for the body of a human being (syn: anatomy, bod, build, chassis, figure, flesh, form, physique, shape, soma)
- (baseball) one of nine divisions of play during which each team has a turn at bat (syn: inning)
- a single drawing in a comic strip
- an application that divides the user's display into two or more windows that can be scrolled independently
- a system of assumptions and standards that sanction behavior and give it meaning

▼ (5)

verb

- enclose in or as if in a frame(syn: border)
- enclose in a frame, as of a picture
- take or catch as if in a snare or trap(syn: ensnare, entrap)
- formulate in a particular style or language (syn: cast, couch, put, redact)
- make up plans or basic details for(syn: compose)
- construct by fitting or uniting parts together

Examples

It was the first state to frame a written constitution.

She framed her questions carefully.

He took the time to frame a thoughtful reply.

She claims that she was framed.

I need new frames for my glasses.

This browser supports frames.

The photographs will look nice framed in black.

Her face was framed in a mass of red hair.

He stood, a threatening figure, framed in the doorway.

Iron is softened and framed.

He is framed to be a soldier.

I cannot frame myself to anything else.

I didn't do the job, I've been framed up.

They removed the picture from its wooden frame.

A clear explanation of the subject provides a frame on which a deeper understanding can be built.

Phrasal verbs

frame up  — construct by fitting or uniting parts together

Word forms

verb
I/you/we/they: frame
he/she/it: frames
present participle: framing
past tense: framed
past participle: framed
noun
singular: frame
plural: frames
See also:  WebsterWiktionaryLongman