Scene - definition, pronunciation, transcription

Amer.  |siːn|  American pronunciation of the word scene
Brit.  |siːn|  British pronunciation of the word scene

noun

- the place where some action occurs
the police returned to the scene of the crime
- an incident (real or imaginary)
their parting was a sad scene
- the visual percept of a region (syn: aspect, panorama, prospect, view, vista)
- a consecutive series of pictures that constitutes a unit of action in a film (syn: shot)
- a situation treated as an observable object (syn: picture)
the religious scene in England has changed in the last century
- a subdivision of an act of a play
the first act has three scenes
- a display of bad temper (syn: conniption, fit, tantrum)
he made a scene
- graphic art consisting of the graphic or photographic representation of a visual percept (syn: view)
he painted scenes from everyday life
- the context and environment in which something is set (syn: setting)
- the painted structures of a stage set that are intended to suggest a particular locale (syn: scenery)
they worked all night painting the scenery

Extra examples

The play's opening scene takes place in the courtyard.

The actor was nervous about his big scene.

Police are now at the scene.

He was not mixed up with the drug scene.

It is not his scene.

It took us 20 takes to get the scene right.

The police asked the crowd to move back from the scene of the accident.

She filled out a police report at the scene of the accident.

Please read act II, scene 1 of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.

Thousands of extras were hired for the battle scene.

Police made a careful examination of the scene.

Reporters called the scene “a disaster area,” and I think that was an accurate description.

The police made a rigorous examination of the evidence at the crime scene.

...as lords of the local real estate scene, they own nearly all of the city's prime pieces of property...

His work dominated the art scene last year.

Word forms

noun
singular: scene
plural: scenes
See also:  WebsterWiktionaryLongman
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