Kick - definition, pronunciation, transcription

Amer.  |kɪk|  American pronunciation of the word kick
Brit.  |ˈkɪk|  British pronunciation of the word kick

noun

- the act of delivering a blow with the foot (syn: boot)
he gave the ball a powerful kick
the team's kicking was excellent
- the swift release of a store of affective force (syn: bang, boot, charge, flush, rush, thrill)
he does it for kicks
- the backward jerk of a gun when it is fired (syn: recoil)
- informal terms for objecting (syn: beef, bitch, gripe, squawk)
- the sudden stimulation provided by strong drink (or certain drugs)
a sidecar is a smooth drink but it has a powerful kick
- a rhythmic thrusting movement of the legs as in swimming or calisthenics
the kick must be synchronized with the arm movements
the swimmer's kicking left a wake behind him

verb

- drive or propel with the foot
- thrash about or strike out with the feet
- strike with the foot
The boy kicked the dog
- kick a leg up
- spring back, as from a forceful thrust (syn: kick back, recoil)
The gun kicked back into my shoulder
- stop consuming (syn: give up)
kick a habit
- make a goal
He kicked the extra point after touchdown
- express complaints, discontent, displeasure, or unhappiness (syn: complain, kvetch, plain, sound off)
She has a lot to kick about

Extra examples

The attacker kicked him in the stomach.

She lost her temper and kicked over the box.

He kicked the ball into the goal.

She kicked the ball to me.

The policeman kicked the door open.

The baby kicked his legs in the air.

The swimming instructor reminded the children to kick their legs as they swam.

The baby kicked with pleasure.

He kicked the winning field goal.

When he was 25, he kicked his cocaine habit and went back to school.

He gave me a kick in the leg.

If you give the machine a little kick, it should start working again.

He kicked him in the stomach.

He kicked open the door.

The moose began kicking with her front legs.

Phrasal verbs

kick about  — be around; be alive or active
kick around  — be around; be alive or active
kick back  — pay a kickback; make an illegal payment
kick in  — enter a particular state
kick off  — commence officially
kick out  — force to leave or move out
kick up  — raising the feet backward with the hands on the ground; a first movement in doing a handstand

Word forms

verb
I/you/we/they: kick
he/she/it: kicks
present participle: kicking
past tense: kicked
past participle: kicked
noun
singular: kick
plural: kicks
See also:  WebsterWiktionaryLongman
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